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ACES COHORT 2 (2020)

Dr. Connie Barroso Garcia
Dr. Connie Barroso Garcia
Dr. Connie Barroso Garcia is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology of the School of Education & Human Development at Texas A&M University and an Accountability, Climate, Equity, and Scholarship Fellow.
 
Her research focuses on understanding the beliefs, attitudes, and emotions surrounding the subject of math and how these affective factors are associated with math achievement, STEM career interest, and other achievement outcomes. Her published work includes investigations on the link between math affect and cognition; undergraduate music majors’ music theory achievement; the relation between math anxiety and math achievement and its moderators; and the conceptualization and development of math intelligence mindset during childhood.


Dr. Jocelyn Frelier
Dr. Jocelyn Frelier
Dr. Jocelyn Frelier is a former Assistant Professor in the Department of Global Languages & Cultures of the College of Arts & Sciences at Texas A&M University and an Accountability, Climate, Equity, and Scholarship (ACES) Fellow.

Her research interests include contemporary French and francophone literature and culture, migration, and gender studies. Her various research projects combine readings of literary texts with transnational and queer theories. She is currently finalizing her first book, Transforming Family: Queer Kinship and Migration in French, Moroccan and Algerian Literature of the 21st Century, in which she examines a selection of novels penned by French-language authors who mobilize their work to depict the struggles confronted by transnationally-positioned families. In her work on family, her research methodology also draws on her autobiographical experiences as the daughter of an Argentine immigrant.

Read the Office for Diversity interviews with Dr. Jocelyn Frelier and Dr. Jocelyn Frelier and Dr. Allegra Midgette.


Dr. ArCasia James-Gallaway
Dr. ArCasia James-Gallaway
Dr. ArCasia James-Gallaway is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Teaching, Learning and Culture of the School of Education & Human Development at Texas A&M University and an Accountability, Climate, Equity, and Scholarship (ACES) Fellow.

Her research seeks to bridge past and present perspectives on African American struggles for educational justice. Her research agenda follows three overlapping strands of inquiry: the history of African American education, Black history education, and Black women's and girls' education experiences. These strands engage critical theories and methodologies such as critical race theory, Black feminist theory, and oral history methodology. They coalesce around the ways white supremacy, antiBlackness, misogynoir, and other interlocking systems of oppression have shaped African American education.

Read the Office for Diversity interview with Dr. James-Gallaway.


Dr. Jesse O'Rear
Dr. Jesse O’Rear
Dr. Jesse O’Rear is a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Performance Studies of the College of Arts & Sciences at Texas A&M University and an Accountability, Climate, Equity, and Scholarship (ACES) Fellow

His research interests include queer and trans studies, feminist theory, autobiography, and devised theatre techniques. He has contributed to multiple anthologies, including the recently published Methuen Drama Book of Trans Plays  and the forthcoming TransNarratives (Canadian Scholars Press). He is also currently developing a performance-based peer education program for LGBTQ students here at Texas A&M.
   
   
Dr. Kathy Pathakis
Dr. Kristy Pathakis
Dr. Kristy Pathakis is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science of the College of Arts & Sciences at Texas A&M University and an Accountability, Climate, Equity, and Scholarship (ACES) Fellow

Her research integrates scholarship in political science, psychology, and sociology to explore the ways that social disadvantage affects people’s motivation to participate in the democratic process and the ways in which they perceive their own qualifications for political participation. She studies how the effects of social disadvantage on political engagement often go beyond the well-documented constraints imposed by resource deprivation and include psychological barriers that prevent people from participating in ways they could if they felt less constrained by social roles and other cultural norms.
   
   
Dr. Cinthya Salazar
Dr. Cinthya Salazar
Dr. Cinthya Salazar is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Educational Administration & Human Resource Development of the School of Education & Human Development at Texas A&M University and an Accountability, Climate, Equity, and Scholarship (ACES) Fellow

Her research focuses on the mechanisms used by undocumented students to access, persist, and succeed in higher education. Through her scholarship, she seeks to generate localized retention theories and student success models which can potentially reduce minoritized student's college attrition. Dr. Salazar's research and pedagogy are informed by her former experiences as a higher education administrator. She worked as a student affairs professional for over eight years, primarily in student retention and success programs. Dr. Salazar continues to be an active member of the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA), supporting practitioners committed to creating equitable learning environments for minoritized students.

Read the Office for Diversity interview with Dr. Cinthya Salazar.