Scroll back to the top

ACES COHORT 3 (2021)

Dr. Benika Dixon
Dr. Benika Dixon
Dr. Benika Dixon is a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics of the School of Public Health at Texas A&M University and an Accountability, Climate, Equity, and Scholarship Faculty Fellow.
 
Her research focuses on understanding the physical and mental health impacts of environmental exposures and hazards, particularly among environmental justice communities and vulnerable populations. Dr. Dixon’s research integrates scholarship in epidemiology, environmental health, hazard and disaster research, and community engagement. She is a Faculty Fellow with Texas A&M University’s Hazard Reduction and Recovery Center (HRRC). Dr. Dixon is also a Founding Fellow of the William Averette Anderson Fund (BAF), whose mission is to expand the number of historically underrepresented professionals in the field of disaster and hazard research and practice.


Dr. Jeehee Han
Dr. Jeehee Han
Dr. Jeehee Han is a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Public Service and Administration of The Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University and an Accountability, Climate, Equity, and Scholarship (ACES) Faculty Fellow.

Her research interest lies at the intersection of housing and education policies for socioeconomically disadvantaged populations. Dr. Han's work primarily focuses on examining the impact of housing assistance programs, fair housing laws, neighborhood resources, and school policies on children's health and education outcomes. She is particularly interested in understanding the circumstances under which children from low-income households may benefit from living in public housing. 


Dr. Spencer Jones
Dr. Spencer Jones
Dr. Spencer Jones is an Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Oceanography of the College of Geosciences at Texas A&M University and an Accountability, Climate, Equity, and Scholarship (ACES) Faculty Fellow.

He studies how global ocean circulation and ocean mixing transport heat, salt and other tracers around the ocean. Dr. Jones uses a variety of models in this work, ranging from simple mathematical models to couple climate models. His published work explores fundamental questions like, Why is the Atlantic saltier than the Pacific? Recently he has been investigating the role of isopycnal mixing in ventilating the deep ocean, both today and at the Last Glacial Maximum.


Dr. Kashi Kafle
Dr. Kashi Kafle
Dr. Kashi Kafle is a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Agricultural Economics of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Texas A&M University and an Accountability, Climate, Equity, and Scholarship (ACES) Faculty Fellow

He studies the intersection of agriculture, poverty, and international development. Dr. Kashi researches critical topics in agricultural and development economics – poverty and inequality, food security, gender and social inclusion, climate change and agricultural water management, and migration in developing countries. His expertise also entails analysis of complex longitudinal data from developing countries. He has several years of experience in designing impact evaluation and other micro-economic household and agricultural surveys in South Asia and Africa. 
   
   
Dr. Rachel Lim
Dr. Rachel Lim
Dr. Rachel Lim is a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of History of the College of Liberal Arts at Texas A&M University and an Accountability, Climate, Equity, and Scholarship (ACES) Faculty Fellow

She is a critical ethnic studies scholar whose research interests include transnational migration, diaspora, race and ethnicity, globalization, and religion. Her work has appeared in multiple scholarly and popular venues, including The Journal of Asian American Studies, Verge: Studies in Global Asias, and The Washington Post. Dr. Lim is currently working on a book manuscript entitled Itinerant Belonging: Korean Transnational Migration to and from Mexico.
   
   
Dr. Grace melo
Dr. Grace Melo
Dr. Grace Melo is an Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Agricultural Economics of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Texas A&M University and an Accountability, Climate, Equity, and Scholarship (ACES) Faculty Fellow

Her current research focuses on consumer demand using national survey data and economic experiments. Dr. Melo received her Ph.D. in Agricultural and Applied Economics from the University of Georgia in 2017. Prior to coming to Texas, she was an Assistant Professor at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, where she conducted research on food policy and taught Agricultural Marketing and Agribusiness. 

Read the Office for Diversity interview with Dr. Grace Melo.
   
   
Dr. Allegra Midgette
Dr. Allegra Midgette
Dr. Allegra Midgette is a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences of the College of Liberal Arts at Texas A&M University and an Accountability, Climate, Equity, and Scholarship Faculty Fellow.
 
Her research examines the origins and social processes that support individuals in developing an understanding of justice and learning how to care for others in an inequitable and unjust world. Her work addresses two key questions: How do we come to care about each other and about justice within the family? How do we become just in the face of inequality? To investigate these questions, Dr. Midgette collaborates with scholars in Brazil, China, Finland, South Korea, and the United States. The long-term goal of her work is to characterize how cultural, societal, and family practices influence individual moral development, with the ultimate aim of supporting the creation of interventions that contribute to individuals’ development into more caring and just individuals.

Read the Office for Diversity interview with Dr. Allegra Midgette.


Dr. Benjamin Montemayor
Dr. Benjamin Montemayor
Dr. Benjamin Montemayor is a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Health and Kinesiology of the College of Education and Human Development at Texas A&M University and an Accountability, Climate, Equity, and Scholarship (ACES) Faculty Fellow.

Dr. Montemayor's research interests include the prevention and intervention of alcohol and other drug (AOD) use among adolescent and young adult at-risk minority populations and underrepresented sub-groups. Specifically, Dr. Montemayor likes to utilize a harm reduction approach in AOD use programming and incorporate theory to help explain and predict the future use of alcohol and other drugs. He is experienced in all stages of AOD use programing, including the development and implementation of both group and individual AOD use intervention programs at previous University's Health and Wellness Departments.


Dr. Jessica Murfree
Dr. Jessica Murfree
Dr. Jessica Murfree is an Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Health and Kinesiology of the College of Education and Human Development at Texas A&M University and an Accountability, Climate, Equity, and Scholarship (ACES) Faculty Fellow.

Her research in the Division of Sport Management focuses on sport ecology, which is the bi-directional relationship between sport and the natural environment. Specifically, she examines the effects of climate change on sport, namely the social and legal implications of extreme weather and climate risks, and environmental injustices faced by minoritized groups in sport and recreation. Dr. Murfree’s research coincides with her active membership on the Sustainability Committee for the North American Society for Sport Management, the Sport Ecology Group, and the Laboratory for Sustainability in Sport at Texas A&M.


Dr. Vanessa Restrepo
Dr. Vanessa Restrepo
Dr. Vanessa Restrepo is a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering of the College of Engineering at Texas A&M University and an Accountability, Climate, Equity, and Scholarship (ACES) Faculty Fellow

Dr. Restrepo is strongly oriented to addressing research in an interdisciplinary manner. She combines principles of solid mechanics, structural analysis, and finite element methods with biology to develop, model, and test bioinspired materials. Her current research focuses on the design and fabrication of sustainable construction structures with enhanced mechanical performance, energy efficiency, and self-repairing properties. Dr. Restrepo envisions her research on bio-inspired design as a steppingstone to the creation of multifunctional materials to perform structural, optical, mechanical, and chemical functions through the judicious arrangement of the components.
   
   
Dr. Lucien Nana Yobo
Dr. Lucien Nana Yobo
Dr. Lucien Nana Yobo is a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Geology and Geophysics of the College of Geosciences at Texas A&M University and an Accountability, Climate, Equity, and Scholarship (ACES) Faculty Fellow

His research uses non-traditional stable isotopes (Ca, Sr, Cr, Mg, Fe) to investigate the effects of past changes in Earth’s history from marine sedimentary rocks. Combined with these proxies, Dr. Nana Yobo also uses numerical box models to understand how these global biogeochemical changes occurred. Currently, his research has focused on Ocean Anoxic Event 2(OAE 2), that occurred in the Cretaceous time. During OAE2 (lasted about 600,000 years) the world’s oceans were depleted of oxygen and his research has focused on understanding how anoxia developed and was sustained.